• New forum software - please post issues in this thread

San Marino

[quote author="ABC123" date=1255416865]<a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPcap/2000-03/16/076r-031600-idx.html">spacer Judgment At Pasadena The Nuremberg Laws Were in California Since 1945. Who Knew?</a>



<blockquote>Community Standards



The answers may lie in the cultural and social norms of Pasadena and neighboring San Marino, a small city where the Huntington is located. In the 1940s, these towns were bastions of white Protestant culture. Minorities were prevented from living there through restrictive covenants enforced by homeowners' associations and, after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the covenants in 1948, through individual land deeds.



San Marino "was truly a racist little community," says Skirball Center President Uri Herscher. "It was packed with oil lords, and no Jews and no Italians lived there."</blockquote></blockquote>


Pasadena was far from the only city with restrictive covenants. Torrance had them. Palos Verdes had them. South Gate had them. There are more, but I can't recall them off the top of my head. As you know, they are no longer valid. If one wishes to move to a community where there were never any restrictive covenants, you're basically looking at post 1950's housing stock and some other communities, Gardena being one (I think).
 

bkshopr_IHB

New member
[quote author="Oxtail" date=1255433283]I've always thought of San Marino as Irvine's counterpart in LA County. San Marino is old money Taiwanese. Well-connected mainland families who moved to Taiwan with the KMT. A lot of doctors and other highly skilled professionals. Parents who graduated from Taipei University(the Harvard of Taiwan). Daughters who win a spot on the Rose Court.



Irvine is more new money Taiwanese. People who made their money in trade or tech. A lot of these people did not grow up with money so they flaunt it in sometimes embarrassing ways. Thank god for strict community rules!



Of course it's not nearly as black and white as I'm painting it. But one thing the Taiwanese in both areas have in common is complaining about the damn mainlanders moving in and taking over. ;)</blockquote>


Other than Taiwanese and Asian drivers SM and Irvine share virtually no subset. The Irvine of LA County is Calabasas, Porter Ranch, Thousand Oaks, and Valencia.



Mainlanders are not in SM. There may be a minority in Irvine.
 

bkshopr_IHB

New member
[quote author="EvaLSeraphim" date=1255433300][quote author="ABC123" date=1255416865]<a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/WPcap/2000-03/16/076r-031600-idx.html">spacer Judgment At Pasadena The Nuremberg Laws Were in California Since 1945. Who Knew?</a>



<blockquote>Community Standards



The answers may lie in the cultural and social norms of Pasadena and neighboring San Marino, a small city where the Huntington is located. In the 1940s, these towns were bastions of white Protestant culture. Minorities were prevented from living there through restrictive covenants enforced by homeowners' associations and, after the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the covenants in 1948, through individual land deeds.



San Marino "was truly a racist little community," says Skirball Center President Uri Herscher. "It was packed with oil lords, and no Jews and no Italians lived there."</blockquote></blockquote>


Pasadena was far from the only city with restrictive covenants. Torrance had them. Palos Verdes had them. South Gate had them. There are more, but I can't recall them off the top of my head. As you know, they are no longer valid. If one wishes to move to a community where there were never any restrictive covenants, you're basically looking at post 1950's housing stock and some other communities, Gardena being one (I think).</blockquote>


I did not know South Gate was once a white elitist community. I knew of Downey, Whittier and La Habra Ht.
 
[quote author="bkshopr" date=1255435130]I did not know South Gate was once a white elitist community. I knew of Downey, Whittier and La Habra Ht.</blockquote>


I only knew of South Gate because of <a href="http://articles.latimes.com/2008/jul/27/local/me-covenant27">this article</a>.



Even though they are no longer enforceable, I hope they remain on title because they would be very important to historians for demographic research (e.g., Gardena was primarily settled by Japanese Americans because they could not live in Torrance, etc.)
 

Geotpf_IHB

New member
[quote author="EvaLSeraphim" date=1255406689][quote author="acpme" date=1255406270]yes because of stringent design guidelines in the city.



here's a page from the design guidelines and it reads just like a bkshopr post. the pics from the page pretty much sums it up: NO MCMANSIONS.</blockquote>


Now if we could only get the County Board of Supes to pass the same rules for North Tustin... The anti-regulation and "property rights" crowd would never go for it, unfortunately.</blockquote>


Well, I'm personally in that particular boat. If you want to build an ugly monstrosity, it's your land, you should be able to do what you want, IMHO.
 

bkshopr_IHB

New member
[quote author="Geotpf" date=1255469433][quote author="EvaLSeraphim" date=1255406689][quote author="acpme" date=1255406270]yes because of stringent design guidelines in the city.



here's a page from the design guidelines and it reads just like a bkshopr post. the pics from the page pretty much sums it up: NO MCMANSIONS.</blockquote>


Now if we could only get the County Board of Supes to pass the same rules for North Tustin... The anti-regulation and "property rights" crowd would never go for it, unfortunately.</blockquote>


Well, I'm personally in that particular boat. If you want to build an ugly monstrosity, it's your land, you should be able to do what you want, IMHO.</blockquote>


Riverside 1920's enclaves and Mission Inn were the destination resort for the rich along with the La Quinta in Indio. Property values were high compared to OC. Well known LA architects designed nice homes for the older wealthy citizens gravitated to the dry heat destination ideal for arthritis.



During the late 1930's both cities wanted to increase population and abolished their architectural guidelines to allow for greater flexibilities in building types as well as styles. Old neighborhoods began to experience tear down for new developments keeping up with the trends. Trends including 50's white flat roofs, the shallow pitched roofs of the 1960's ranch, contractor modern condos of the 70's and the 80's Mediterranean have all diluted the quaint neighborhoods once homes to the orchard barons.



Riverside has not recovered from a bad decision made long ago during the 1930's despite of having the top Mission Inn Hotel, UC Riverside and the near by world renowned Loma Linda Hospital and Research Center RE property value has always been the lowest of all SoCal counties.
 

xoneinax_IHB

New member
[quote author="bkshopr" date=1255435130]I did not know South Gate was once a white elitist community</blockquote>It was a white bastion till the mid-50s, as was Huntington Park.

<a href="http://www.streetgangs.com/history/hist01.html">Some LA gang history</a>



"In Huntington Park, Bell, and South Gate, towns that were predominately white, teenagers formed some of the early street clubs during the 1940s. One of the most infamous clubs of that time was the Spook Hunters, a group of white teenagers that often attacked black youths. If blacks were seen outside of the black settlement area, which was roughly bounded by Slauson to the South, Alameda Avenue to the east, and Main[5] Street to the west, they were often attacked. The name of this club emphasized their racist attitude towards blacks, as ?Spook? is a derogatory term used to identify blacks and ?Hunters? highlighted their desire to attack blacks as their method of fighting integration and promoting residential segregation. Their animosity towards blacks was publicly known; the back of their club jackets displayed an animated black face with exaggerated facial features and a noose hanging around the neck."
 

Geotpf_IHB

New member
[quote author="bkshopr" date=1255496688][quote author="Geotpf" date=1255469433][quote author="EvaLSeraphim" date=1255406689][quote author="acpme" date=1255406270]yes because of stringent design guidelines in the city.



here's a page from the design guidelines and it reads just like a bkshopr post. the pics from the page pretty much sums it up: NO MCMANSIONS.</blockquote>


Now if we could only get the County Board of Supes to pass the same rules for North Tustin... The anti-regulation and "property rights" crowd would never go for it, unfortunately.</blockquote>


Well, I'm personally in that particular boat. If you want to build an ugly monstrosity, it's your land, you should be able to do what you want, IMHO.</blockquote>


Riverside 1920's enclaves and Mission Inn were the destination resort for the rich along with the La Quinta in Indio. Property values were high compared to OC. Well known LA architects designed nice homes for the older wealthy citizens gravitated to the dry heat destination ideal for arthritis.



During the late 1930's both cities wanted to increase population and abolished their architectural guidelines to allow for greater flexibilities in building types as well as styles. Old neighborhoods began to experience tear down for new developments keeping up with the trends. Trends including 50's white flat roofs, the shallow pitched roofs of the 1960's ranch, contractor modern condos of the 70's and the 80's Mediterranean have all diluted the quaint neighborhoods once homes to the orchard barons.



Riverside has not recovered from a bad decision made long ago during the 1930's despite of having the top Mission Inn Hotel, UC Riverside and the near by world renowned Loma Linda Hospital and Research Center RE property value has always been the lowest of all SoCal counties.</blockquote>


There are still a lot of very nice older homes in Riverside, especially in the Wood Streets, Victoria, and downtown areas, many of which are protected by design restrictions and the like. A large segment of the city is tract homes built in the 1950's and 1960's (mostly small houses on fairly large lots). These were mostly built on former farms or vacant land; other than an occassional farm house, I don't think there were many tear downs to build them. Sometimes the farm house survives, surrounded by newer houses. Riverside only became really built out recently; most tract construction is still on vacant land. Somebody buying a single house, tearing it down, and building a new one is fairly rare, due to the fact that there are plenty on undeveloped lots available.



In the 1880's, the city of Riverside actually had the highest per capita income of any city in the country. Oranges were very profitable, plus the area had lots of rich people retiring out here, for the year round warm weather. Of course, that's before the area was coated in smog-I blame that more than anything else for the area's decline.
 
Top