Author Topic: Mass Transit  (Read 7354 times)

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Offline nosuchreality

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #30 on: April 25, 2018, 11:56:51 AM »

Offline StarmanMBA

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #31 on: April 25, 2018, 01:38:27 PM »
Amazingly I'm with Star on this one. Mass transit is not the solution. It's a last gen solution and not a next gen one. Also, mass transit works best in major cities centered around a downtown core.


Yes indeed, using common sense and good judgment is "amazing," isn't it.

Afternote:  In the YouTube video above, the last collision illustrates an unusual confluence of three egregious mistakes, any one of which if avoided would have spared the pedestrian his grievous injuries.

First you see the pedestrian on the left, walking against a red light.  No big deal but he paid no attention to the car rapidly approaching from his right, through a green light.
Incredibly careless and stupid.

Second, you see the car at bottom right, running a red light. 

Third, the car running the red light hits the back end of the third participant who pays no attention to a pedestrian in the crosswalk.  Had that third person hit the brakes, he or she might not have been hit by the car running the red light. 

The pedestrian was rolled over and put in the ambulance, presumed to be DOA.  When he groaned, they applied life-saving measures and he had a very long rehabilitation period.  His life was spared only because the huge dent in the car allowed space for his body as it rolled over him.

« Last Edit: April 26, 2018, 12:23:57 PM by StarmanMBA »
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Offline eyephone

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #32 on: April 25, 2018, 01:43:24 PM »
Amazingly I'm with Star on this one. Mass transit is not the solution. It's a last gen solution and not a next gen one. Also, mass transit works best in major cities centered around a downtown core.


Yes indeed, using common sense and good judgment is "amazing," isn't it.

So do the following cities: Austin, OKC, Durham have bad judgement since they are going to have a light rail or already have one? (GOP stronghold)
I’m sure there’s more ....


Offline acpme

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #33 on: April 25, 2018, 02:09:42 PM »
Amazingly I'm with Star on this one. Mass transit is not the solution. It's a last gen solution and not a next gen one. Also, mass transit works best in major cities centered around a downtown core.


Yes indeed, using common sense and good judgment is "amazing," isn't it.

So do the following cities: Austin, OKC, Durham have bad judgement since they are going to have a light rail or already have one? (GOP stronghold)
I’m sure there’s more ....

OKC might be an exception, but even in the reddest states, the central counties of their large metros generally are blue. It's certainly true of Texas. Austin is definitely not a GOP stronghold. The motto of the town is "Keep Austin weird". The Texas state govt is relatively small so it's really become a tech and college town today. Same goes for the Raleigh-Durham metro.



Recall that Californians decided to vote in favor of high speed rail in Nov 2008 just as our economy was collapsing. So yes, municipalities and voters can have bad judgment.

Offline acpme

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #34 on: April 25, 2018, 02:16:15 PM »
According to Austin's metro website, these are the M-Th hours for the train. Trains every 30 min doesn't seem like enough for rush hour. The 6:30 pm final train renders this method of transportation unusable for many workers, especially younger ones that tend to work later or go out after work. In a town that is young and vibrant, known for its food and music scene, how can you have a train that stops running that early 4 days out of the week?

When it Runs
Monday-Thursday: Approximately every 35 during morning and evening rush hours. Hourly during midday. The last train leaves downtown at 6:25 p.m.

Friday: Approximately every 35 minutes during morning and evening rush hours. Hourly during midday and following the evening rush hour. The last train leaves downtown at 12:25 a.m.

Saturday: Approximately every 35 minutes from late afternoon until late night. The last train leaves downtown at 12:03 a.m.

Offline fortune11

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #35 on: April 25, 2018, 02:30:28 PM »
Given that nothing really new is getting built or will get built best way forward would be experimentation and incremental steps

Ultimately no one knows what future will bring. but those who are dynamic at least try different ideas and then scale up whatever works for your particular local situation.

nothing wrong with trying light rail on a portion of the commute routes , or shared vans in dedicated lanes (which could then be converted to autonomous lanes down the road) , but just throwing your hands up and blaming the other side (whoever that happens to be) and doing nothing at all --- is not a good solution .

Offline StarmanMBA

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #36 on: April 25, 2018, 03:42:20 PM »

nothing wrong with trying light rail on a portion of the commute routes , or shared vans in dedicated lanes (which could then be converted to autonomous lanes down the road) , but just throwing your hands up and blaming the other side (whoever that happens to be) and doing nothing at all --- is not a good solution .

And YOU have "a good solution"?  Throwing more money at whatever the problem you perceive may be? 

$300,000,000 per mile in Seattle for "light (sic) rail" is an obscene burden on youth, particularly when buses can carry many more than they already do just by increasing the schedule, or changing the route instantly.

For five or ten people, a new "short route" of "light (sic) rail" would be just dandy.
But freeways aren't full of commuters who are going to switch to your public transportation system.   
qwerty:  Hey StarmanMBA, go fuck yourself.
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Offline eyephone

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #37 on: April 25, 2018, 04:03:56 PM »
Hyperloop testing in Hawthorne

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.teslarati.com/elon-musk-tesla-inside-boring-co-test-tunnel/amp/


Given that nothing really new is getting built or will get built best way forward would be experimentation and incremental steps

Ultimately no one knows what future will bring. but those who are dynamic at least try different ideas and then scale up whatever works for your particular local situation.

nothing wrong with trying light rail on a portion of the commute routes , or shared vans in dedicated lanes (which could then be converted to autonomous lanes down the road) , but just throwing your hands up and blaming the other side (whoever that happens to be) and doing nothing at all --- is not a good solution .

Offline Irvinecommuter

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #38 on: May 04, 2018, 11:54:45 AM »
Quote
Amazon has narrowed its search for the location of its second headquarters to 20 finalists out of 238 applicants, and a common theme has emerged: Amazon wants its second home to have a strong public transportation network, reports the Wall Street Journal.

Among Amazon's requirements are a population of at least a million people, public transportation, a major airport with connections to its current Seattle headquarters, and a large pool of technical talent in the area. Amazon will bring up to 50,000 jobs to its second headquarters' home and is aware that many of those positions will need to be filled by people who live outside the city. Amazon wants its commuters to have the option of using public transit, rather than cars, to get to work. Many major cities, such as Detroit, Sacramento, and Cincinnati, have already been eliminated from consideration.

http://www.thedrive.com/news/20609/lack-of-public-transportation-turns-off-amazon-in-its-search-for-a-second-hq

Offline eyephone

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #39 on: May 04, 2018, 01:44:46 PM »
“Dodgers come up with unusual solution to fans getting stuck in traffic

A company has proposed building a gondola that would take fans from Union Station to Dodger Stadium in five minutes, according to the Los Angeles Times. Oh, and about that company … it’s funded by former Dodgers owner Frank McCourt.

It’s an unusual idea, but all parties seem to be seriously considering it. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti is on board and the Dodgers endorsed the project as “an important and innovative project.”

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.yahoo.com/amphtml/sports/dodgers-come-unusual-solution-fans-getting-stuck-traffic-172225260.html

Offline smithassignment1

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #40 on: May 13, 2018, 10:29:53 PM »
Oh thanks for the adding me in the forum. cities like Austin, Durham give a bad judgement since they are going to start a light rail.

Offline eyephone

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #41 on: May 13, 2018, 10:42:21 PM »
Oh thanks for the adding me in the forum. cities like Austin, Durham give a bad judgement since they are going to start a light rail.

How about Atlanta, Houston and Dallas? (light rail)  ;)
« Last Edit: May 13, 2018, 10:49:42 PM by eyephone »

Offline eyephone

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #42 on: May 13, 2018, 10:49:03 PM »
Lawmakers Reconsider Indianapolis Light Rail Ban for Amazon

Lawmakers are reconsidering a state ban on light rail in Indianapolis with hopes of landing Amazon's second North American headquarters.


https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/indiana/articles/2018-01-28/lawmakers-reconsider-indianapolis-light-rail-ban-for-amazon



Offline momopi

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #43 on: May 14, 2018, 08:21:40 AM »
Oh thanks for the adding me in the forum. cities like Austin, Durham give a bad judgement since they are going to start a light rail.

* momopi eyes signature URL

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Offline acpme

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Re: Mass Transit
« Reply #44 on: May 15, 2018, 08:21:59 AM »
Quote
How about Atlanta, Houston and Dallas? (light rail)  ;)

Mass transit in sunbelt states... enjoy walking around in the summer! I spend a lot of time in TX and using public transportation in its sprawling cities 9 months out of the year is not fun.

Unless you live in Downtown Dallas, which only has a residential population of 5k people, DART is not that useful aside from trips to the airport. Per their own data, light rail ridership is flat or just up slightly in the last 2 years. Regional rail ridership has been trending down since 2008. There's a limited route trolley now that is more amusement than useful public transportation. Flat ridership despite BOOMING population means something is going wrong. Part of what went wrong is all the infrastructure investment went into the urban core of Dallas County, but the metro area's growth has been in the far northern suburbs of Collin County (Plano, Frisco, Allen).

http://www.dart.org/about/board/boardagendas/2018workshopridership.pdf

Houston tried to do light rail in the 80s and it was also a failed experiment. Finally opening in 2004 after 20 yrs, the average weekday ridership is about 60k. Out of a 2.5M person workforce - that's just 2% of the workforce. It's created a big debate in town as the metro area has been booming (aside from a brief downturn in 2015-2016 when oil prices collapsed, although that only impacted job growth - Houston's population still continued to grow at an above national avg pace) but Downtown road capacity has effectively been taken away because drivers now have to share its lanes with lightly used trains.

In preparation for the light rail decades ago, most office buildings were built with lobbies on the 2nd floor since it was expected that the street level would be filled with trains and train stations. The result is a Downtown that is very devoid of street life since there is very little retail. Most of the retail is in underground tunnels which connect the major office buildings - again, this was also in part because of the lousy weather much of the year. So in the ideal world, you'd take the metro, hop off close to work, enjoy a nice walk on the street while picking up your Sbux on the way to the office, and all is good. Instead in Houston, you get off the train and still have a bit of a hike to the office due to the limited stations, its 95 degrees and muggy (or raining), and there's nothing to enjoy on the walk because there's no street retail. It's simply more convenient and comfortable to drive, park in your bldg or a structure, and walk the tunnels to work. The city invested 2 decades into the light rail experiment and now retail and office landlords are spending billions to try to de-fortress their lobbies and create life back onto the street level of the city. But that will take decades as well. In the meantime, companies have chosen to simply move their operations out of downtown to the suburbs like Galleria, Energy Corridor or the Woodlands.

I'm not against mass transit. Proponents of it generally have their heart in the right place. It's just that automatically assuming it will work everywhere or taking a what's the harm in trying attitude often has unintended consequences.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2018, 08:33:39 AM by acpme »

 

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